Red Georgia Clay

There are a lot of things I like about living in the south like a longer show season, more options to show at, and mild winters. There are, however, two thins I really despise: the humidity and the red Georgia clay. I have grown up listening to, and loving, country songs but when I was singing along to the likes of Brooks and Dunn’s “Red Dirt Road” I had no idea. If you’ve never lived in or spent time in Georgia, let me tell you about it. Red Georgia clay is actually red (why do you think red brick houses are so prevalent down here?), it’s everywhere, and it stains everything.

Usually I can get Gus’ tail a pretty perfect white with just my trusty bluing shampoo and a lot of hot water but even I was thwarted this week when Gus came in with a tail worthy of any chestnut. Red Georgia clay does not care that I have a schooling show this weekend and that my horse should have a beautiful white tail… not this orangey mess. I half heartedly went through my normal bathing process but I knew it wasn’t going to do much to combat that tail.

So I pulled out the secret weapon and got to work.

Anybody who regularly colors their hair knows that dying and, in particular, bleaching hair is not good so I do not fall back on this regularly. Plus, it is a LOT of work. Usually I only bleach before something important. Last time I did this with Gus was when we took our engagement photos. That was a year and a half ago so I guess we were due.

Let me tell you, the bleach works!

I know several of you have asked me how I get Gus’ tail so white and I promise I will do a tutorial both on my shampoo method and how to bleach. I just wasn’t prepared to do it last night. You really need a second set of hands for pictures when you’re working with bleach!

Now hopefully Gus can keep this tail semi clean for two days so I’m not the “Horse with an Orange Tail” at Chatt Hills!